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Hollywood Babylon – The Inside Story on the Occult Empire

Hollywood is, as David Lynch titles it, an “inland empire” – a kind of covenantal city-state of its own, with its own religion, including all the trappings of neophytes, acolytes, servants, agents, star saints, hierophants and hierarchs and holy sites.  It is a veritable polis of initiatory esoterica where the holy sites and rites of Hollywood are not the altars of mainstream religion, but another ancient religion, ultimately summed up in the epithet of the ancient mysteries.  The ancient mysteries comprise the competing religious practices of the empires of old, but the one empire that seems to have achieved the most appropriate association with Hollywood is Babylon – the “gate of the gods”.

Babylon was the ancient pagan empire prominent in biblical prophetic works as an enemy of God’s people due to their idolatry.  Hollywood is no different, functioning as the propaganda arm of the antichrist media establishment, intent on re-engineering society into its alchemical opposite, unleashing the destructive forces of cultural Marxism and death.  This is why stories and narratives continue to emerge of Hollywood scandals, sex and murder rituals and occult crime, with no puzzle pieces ever put together from mindless denizens of talking head puppetdom.  From the dozens of in-depth analyses on my site looking into the esoteric meanings in Hollywood films, it logically follows that this classic thesis of “Hollywood Babylon” is not far off.  This title is not new, either: detailed accounts are found in insider researchers like Peter Levenda, and even older than his Sinister Forces trilogy, occultist Kenneth Anger’s book and documentary, Hollywood Babylon, which (documentary)

From its beginnings, Hollywood has been an empire of tragedies, full of lost lives, drugs, and real life drama, but this troupe lifestyle is nothing new.  The stage has long been the site of tragedy and something much darker – ritual invocation, all the way back to the ancient Greeks and Romans.  For Greece and Rome, the stage was sacred, where the dramaturgical interactions of the gods were actually a form of magical invocation.  The actors donned the costumes of the gods, with the playwright scripting the narrative to inculcate the masses into the appropriate morals of the state.  Although the idea of the theater as explicitly sacred is foreign to the modernity, it was not for historic man, nor is modern man’s praxis any less religious in regard to the theater.  Sir James Frazier elaborates the ancient belief in the magical character of dramaturgy and acting in his classic The Golden Bough:

“Here then at the great sanctuary of the goddess in Zela it appears that her myth was regularly translated into action; the story of her love and the death of her divine lover was performed year by year as a sort of mystery-play by men and women who lived for a season and sometimes died in the character of the visionary beings whom they personated. The intention of these sacred dramas, we may be sure, was neither to amuse nor to instruct an idle audience, and as little were they designed to gratify the actors, to whose baser passions they gave the reins for a time. They were solemn rites which mimicked the doings of divine beings, because man fancied that by such mimicry he was able to arrogate to himself the divine functions and to exercise them for the good of his fellows. The operations of nature, to his thinking, were carried on by mythical personages very like himself; and if he could only assimilate himself to them completely he would be able to wield all their powers.

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