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Interstellar (2014) – The Secret Revelation

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Interstellar is a grandiose film about a great number of serious philosophical and scientific concepts. It’s also about a host other things, such as love, life, mistakes, meaning, etc., so knowing where to start an anlysis is a bit challenging, though as many of my friends have said, it seems to be the perfect “JaysAnalysis” movie. I concur. Many sites that have posted analyses make the correct point of viewing it as Christopher Nolan’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, and while that is fine as far as it goes, it also departs from Kubrick’s film in significant ways. I will go all out on this one like I did with Inception, which is the first analysis to gain a lot of traction – I think I have decoded the real meaning of Interstellar, so stick around for my big reveal at the end!

As often occurs, no other analyses seem to grasp the real point of the film. You’ll either see a philosophical analysis or a scientific one, with the latter usually bitching about some disputed sciencey detail that doesn’t matter anyway (it’s fiction). Nolan intends to not insult the audience’s intelligence, contrary to most of Hollywood, so fedoratheists ought to be grateful rather than stroking their own virtual E-egos, echoing some nitpicking from DeNeil Grassy McTyson. I also see connections to Inception I will detail below, and in ballsy fashion proclaim that I will give you the conspiratorial and esoteric side none of the other sites will. As difficult as the film is to unpack, I can’t imagine the challenge of creating it, and Nolan’s preferred choice of not using CGI green screen vomit is all the more admirable. Let us ponder.

Interstellar begins by showing us a near future where the apocalypse is nigh: Earth is approaching its death-knell due to unexplained blights that have ravaged the planet. Famine is the chief concern as major crops such as corn are on their way out and farming is en vogue. We learn later that for whatever reason, oxygen began to deplete and the “dirt itself” turned on mankind – man and the earth are cursed. Edenic imagery is present here, as the dust of death to which man returns recalls the curse of Genesis 3 for rebellion in the Garden. While we are not told, one might speculate that genetically modifying crops and geoengineering the atmosphere may have been the cause of the blight and famine, and many in alternative media have been warning of this very real possibility. However, I am going to go out on a limb and propose a more speculative thesis no one else will: Interstellar is actually about the real secret space program and the plan to go off world to terraform, and beyond that, something even more outlandish. I recognize the high level of mad hatter tin foilage this evokes to many new readers, but bear with me and hear my case.

Cooper (Matthew McConaughey), a former NASA pilot and engineer who suffers nightmares following the loss of his wife and a past flight crash, finds himself and his family forced into a meager agrarian lifestyle as a result of the shutdown of NASA for aforementioned pragmatic communal concerns. Cooper’s daughter, Murph, shares the same fire for adventure and exploration as her humbled father, indulging her gifted inquisitive and speculative side in devouring books and debating her teachers. In fact, New America has even changed its textbooks to portray the original NASA Apollo mission as a faked charade to “bankrupt the Soviet Empire.” Conspiracy theorists globally perked up at that one, as Cooper is rebuffed by Murph’s school officials she isn’t qualified for college, being too rebellious. At this juncture, it is important to delve into what I think is the purpose of this puzzling faked moon landing reference.

 

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