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Israel and Saudi Arabia: Best Friends Forever

Israel and Saudi Arabia

have a snug and cozy relationship. They are, indeed, BFF or best friends forever as a typical Western teenage girl might label them. At first glance, it admittedly seems extremely odd that the Zionist regime of Israel, holding such an antagonistic presence towards Arabs in the Middle East, would be friends with arguably the most powerful Muslim nation in the region (alongside Iran). However, that is precisely what makes their allegiance so dangerous and nefarious. If you don’t look closely, you would never expect it. The truth is that these 2 nations have the same geopolitical aims and allies – which bodes ill for Palestine, Syria, Iraq and other “lesser” countries standing in their way. They have a number of common enemies, such as Iran, Shi’a Islam, Hamas, Hezbollah, pan-Arab nationalism and the Muslim Brotherhood. Understanding the depth and nature of the relationship between Israel and Saudi Arabia sheds a clear light on what is happening in the Middle East, the geopolitics of the US-UK-Zionist axis, and the New World Order push towards World War 3.

Israel and Saudi Arabia: Brief History of a Love Affair

To understand the relationship between Israel and Saudi Arabia, you first need to know how Saudi Arabia become a country. The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) as it is formally called remains the only nation on the entire Earth to be named after and ruled by a single family (although in this there are already similarities with Israel, which is basically Rothschild-ville). As this writer points out in his article How Zionism helped create the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the British helped form the kingdom during the 1920s:

“The defeat of the Ottoman Empire by British imperialism in World War One, left three distinct authorities in the Arabian peninsula: Sharif of Hijaz: Hussain bin Ali of Hijaz (in the west), Ibn Rashid of Ha’il (in the north) and Emir Ibn Saud of Najd (in the east) and his religiously fanatical followers, the Wahhabis.”

Of these 3, Britain got the most help during WW1 from the Sharif of Hussain, who led the Arab Revolt against the Turks and helped the British defeat them. After the war, Hussain was hoping the British would keep their word (as he saw it) and agree to the establishment of a single Arabian country from Gaza to the Persian Gulf. However Britain, as it has done many times in the past, did not keep its promises. Instead, along with France, it drew up the Sykes-Picot agreement in 1916 (which I coved in my article Foreign Meddling in Syria: Decades Longer Than You Thought …) and issued the Balfour Declaration in 1917 (which mandated the establishment of Jewish Zionist state in Palestine at the prompting of the Rothschilds). The Sharif was not happy and told the British that he would never:

“… sell out Palestine to the Empire’s Balfour Declaration; he [would] never acquiesce to the establishment of Zionism in Palestine or accept the new random borders drawn across Arabia by British and French imperialists.”

 

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