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NBC: Your Children Will be Microchipped “Sooner Rather Than Later”

An NBC News report that promotes the microchipping of children asserts that it will happen “sooner rather than later” and that Americans will eventually accept the process as something just as normal as the barcode

It goes on to highlight mother of three Steffany Rodroguez-Neely, who talks about how she briefly lost her daughter after she hid behind a rack of clothes, bringing to the fore, “every parent’s nightmare when you can’t find your child.”

If it’ll save my kid, there’s no stuff that’s too extreme,” says Rodroguez-Neely. “Micro-chipping would be an extra layer of protection, if something bad does happen.”

Rodroguez-Neely goes on to explain how she has braved skepticism from members of the local Tampa Bay Moms Group, people like Kerri Levey, who are wary about implanting their own children.

“You’re putting a battery in your kid, you’re putting a chip in your kid. And, where does it stop,” asks Levey. “Where? It’s going too far. This is a child we’re talking about.”

“If a small chip the size of a grain of rice could have prevented a tragedy, I think most parents would have said, I think I would have done it,” responds Rodroguez-Neely.

The piece flips back to pushing the idea when it quotes electronics expert Stuart Lipoff, who asserts that microchipping children is safe and inevitable.

“People should be aware that testing is being done right now. The military is not only testing this out, but already utilizes its properties. It’s not a matter of if it will happen, but when,” states Lipoff.

Lipoff also told NBC that people shouldn’t be concerned about “big brother” tracking their children and that the technology was merely an upgrade on the traditional barcode.

“When barcodes first came out in the late 1960s, people were appalled. They were wary of them and did not understand the concept. Today, it is so commonplace, we don’t even notice it. A microchip would work much in the same way,” he states, adding that it will “definitely happen”.

NBC reporter Melanie Michael appears to agree, remarking that the size of the chip is “very very small” and that “the expert tells us this will happen sooner rather than later.”

“You can bet somewhere someone someday is going to pull this off and we could see those microchips in everyone,” she adds.

The sheer creepiness of children being treated like barcoded products seems to be lost on Michael.

The entire premise of the piece is extremely odd to say the least. Did Rodroguez-Neely approach NBC with the idea to promote implantable microchips as a way of finding lost children, or is the segment a pure propaganda blitz to normalize the idea in the minds of the viewers?

Either way, it doesn’t come across as very balanced, aggressively promoting the safety aspect of the microchip over concerns about its clear Orwellian scope.