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The Commie Connection – FDR and Stalin

For all those admirers of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who believe he was a great president, remove the blinders and face up to the fact that his socialist mindset and administration destroyed the last remnants of the Old Republic. Most of these same cheer leaders for the “New Deal” are in love with big government and seek to empower a federal authority at the expense of the Federalism model that is based upon separations of power and States Rights. With the unholy alliance with the Soviet Union, FDR linked his inner objectives with the greatest autocrat liquidator that fought World War II, as a Communist expansionist to destroy most of the traditional institutions that make up Western Civilization.

Cited in an article Obama right that Roosevelt was called a socialist and a communist, is an insightful quote. It indicates the true attitude and sympathies of FDR towards the Soviet regime.

“The Russian newspapers during the last election [1932] published the photograph of Franklin D. Roosevelt over the caption, ‘The first communistic President of the United States,'” said Sen. Thomas Schall, a Republican from Minnesota. “Evidently the Russian newspapers had knowledge concerning the ultimate intent of the President, which had been carefully withheld from the voters in this country.  In fact, the voters of the United States were meticulously misled as to such intentions.” We found Schall’s comments in the book, All But the People: Franklin D. Roosevelt and his Critics, 1933-1939.”

While such condemnation should not be new to seasoned historians, the general public has been so isolated from the realities of the 1930’s and 1940’s that a refresher course is necessary to dispel all the favorable myths regarding the systematic deconstruction of America.

Ponder the wisdom of one of the greatest America First proponents, quoted in the Communist influence over President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

“By 1938, Garet Garrett, distinguished newspaperman, author and editorial write for the Saturday Evening Post, published an essay, “The Revolution Was.” In the opening paragraph, he said:

There are those who still think they are holding the pass against a revolution that may be coming up the road. But they are gazing in the wrong direction. The revolution is behind them. It went by in the Night of Depression, singing songs of freedom (Garrett, The People’s Pottage, p. 7)

Garrett went on to show that every problem faced by the New Deal was solved in a way which transformed the traditional concept of limited self government into a system that could not fail to:

Ramify the authority and power of executive government—its power, that is, to rule by decrees and rules and regulations of its own making.

Strengthen its hold on the economic life of the nation.

Extend its power over the individual.

Degrade Congress and the parliamentary principle.

Impair the great American tradition of an independent Constitutional judicial power.

Weaken all other powers—private enterprise, private finance, and the power of state and local governments.”

This litany of betrayal is ignored in mainstream society, because it is distasteful to admit that the country was destroyed from the oval office itself.

In the brilliant essay, The Friends of Uncle Joe, the deeply missed Joseph Sobran strikes to the core with his analysis.

Roosevelt’s eulogists likewise avoid the subject of Stalin, for whom FDR had the highest regard, calling him “a Christian gentleman” during the Yalta conference. He had befriended Stalin from the first year of his administration, when he extended diplomatic recognition to the murderous pariah state. Time and again he chose to help “Uncle Joe” when he didn’t have to, appeasing him from a position of strength. Even Neville Chamberlain never idealized Hitler as “Uncle Adolf.” When FDR asked Pope Pius XII to condemn Hitler, Pius sent back word that if he did so he would also have to condemn Stalin; Roosevelt withdrew the request.

Stalin had shown his true colors long before Roosevelt and Churchill took on as their ally the brave, bluff “Uncle Joe.” Had they never heard of the forced famine of Ukraine, the NKVD mass arrests, the Gulag camps, the purges and show trials, the murder of Trotsky, the invasions of Poland (with the Katyn Forest massacre of 15,000 Polish officers), Finland, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania? All these things, and more, revealed not only the brutality of Stalin but the logic of Communism itself, which had begun its reign in Russia with the mass murder of Orthodox priests under Lenin. Communism was in essence a reversion to the principles of primitive warfare, directed not only against external enemies but against its own subjects if they resisted (or were even suspected of a disposition to resist) its tyranny.”

For an in-depth look at Roosevelt and Stalin — The Subversion of FDR’s Government by Communist Traitors and Fellow Travelers, the book review of M. Stanton Evans and Herbert Romerstein is worth a look. “The importance of this book is that it not only exposes the penetration of the U.S. government by full-fledged Soviet spies but also documents the subversion by communist “agents of influence” subservient to Stalin and the USSR high up in the FDR administration.”

Doubting Roosevelt’s involvement, the sordid History, lies, FDR, and Stalin makes a powerful statement:

“FDR praised Stalin’s constitution for guaranteeing religious freedom while ignoring the purges, show trials, aggression against countries adjacent to Russia, and the persecution of the Russian Christians. It may sound incredibly today but FDR called Stalin, the Communist butcher, a Christian gentleman. Ever read that in high school? FDR was Stalin’s best friend among world leaders and that is in spite of Stalin killing more people before WWII started than Hitler would kill during the war. Amazing is it not?”

So what does all this mean? The absurdity that America and the English befriended Stalin as a necessary ally in the struggle to defeat Hitler misses the similar collectivist attitudes and authoritarian motives that both countries exhibited towards the New World Order that resulted from the disastrous conflict.

Charles G. Stefan provides a retrospective view in the account, Roosevelt and the Wartime Summit Conferences with Stalin.

“I conclude that FDR had no illusions about the nature of Stalin’s régime. Recognizing the vital role played by the USSR in the war against Germany, however, he sought to develop personal contacts with the Soviet leader comparable to the close relations he had already established with Churchill. His objective was twofold: using persuasion, to ensure Soviet entry into the war against Japan and to enlist Soviet backing for the establishment of a United Nations along the lines proposed by the United States. At Yalta he achieved considerable success in achieving those basic goals.”

What can be drawn from this evaluation? No doubt Roosevelt knew the sinister nature of the Soviet dictator, but to conclude that FDR was simply being pragmatic in forging an alliance to combat Nazism misses the underlying anti-liberty similarities that both potentates shared. Likewise the post war strategy was based upon implementing a universal tyranny under the globalist banner of world governance. Establishing the UN was the first step in dismantling sovereignty of independent countries.

The despicable record of the ‘Man of Steel’, Joseph Stalin is painful to read much less digest. In the final scrutiny of 20th century evil, what makes the victor a hero? The world was not saved from National Socialism by the expansion of totalitarian communism. Nor was the emerging American empire a noble substitute for a limited government republic.

The FDR legacy is not heroic and his shared sympathies with the ruthless Soviet oppressor are disgraceful. Degrees of evil are phantom separations when the ultimate purpose of either regime is to enslave and create dependency on their citizens. Each despot displays a flagrant disregard for respecting legitimate restrains on their powers, but every tyrant is willing to forfeit the natural rights of individuals to maintain and further their dominance of rule.

This forbidden history is far too distasteful for most to face up to and therefore, many will just dismiss it as erroneous or fictitious. Such denial has become central to a society that ignores political truths if unpleasant and earth shattering.

Confusion and self-delusion is the hallmark of a failed social structure. The Soviet gulag collapsed and it will not be long before the American police state implodes.

Confronting one’s own history is often difficult. The U.S. Presidency is now a repressive dictatorship. Much of the blame for setting this trend into motion lies at the feet of Roosevelt and his fellow travelers.

The term “Commie” has varied meaning and associations for different people. In the end, it embodies authoritarianism with no trace of compassion or respect for the individual.

The State once comprised supreme authority. This new millennium has produced a one world realm of globalism under the banner of the international community. Individual and independent sovereignty was assaulted last century. Now such intrinsic aspects must be completely purged from the final solution. Blame the collectivists for destroying self determination.