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The Rolling Stones and the Occult



The credit for the origination of today’s blatantly Satanic “heavy metal rock,” goes to the English group, the Rolling Stones. Their rise to fame was closely connected with that of the Beatles.

The Stones, as they were called, were widely characterized as the counterparts to the Beatles. “The Stones” were “mean,” “dirty” and “rebellious,” whereas the Beatles were the well-groomed “Fab Four.” Though seemingly competitors, they were merely two sides of the same operation. The Stones’ first hit record was actually written by the Beatles, and it was Beatle member George Harrison who set up the arrangements for their first recording contract.

Following the same game plan as the Beatles, in the spring of 1963 the Rolling Stones appeared on one of England’s most popular family television shows, Thank Your Lucky Stars. Only this time, the reaction by the middle-aged viewers was quite different from that to the Beatles. Hundreds of angry letters were sent, with a typical letter stating “It is disgraceful that long-haired louts such as these should be allowed to appear on television. Their appearance was absolutely disgusting.”


The program, however, had exactly the planned effect. Rolling Stones’ manager Andrew Oldham was elated at the response. He told the group, “We’re going to make you exactly opposite to those nice, clean, tidy Beatles. And the more the parents hate you, the more the kids will love you. Just wait and see.”(Tony Sanchez, Up and Down WIth the Rolling Stones, p.17)

In 1964, the Rolling Stones appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show, as the Beatles had done earlier. This time though, the coast-to-coast audience beheld the spectacle of the television studio being ripped to shreds by Stones fans. Sullivan said on the air afterward, “I promise you, they will never be back on our show.” The publicity, however, was exactly what was wanted. Within a few months, the group’s records were selling millions of copies.

The plan was now to use both the Beatles and the Rolling Stones as the means to transform an entire generation into heathen followers of the New Age, followers which could mold into the future cadre of a Satanic movement and then deploy into our schools, law enforcment agencies and political leadership.


In his book, The Ultimate Evil, investigator-author Maury Terry writes that between 1966 and 1967, the Satanic cult, the Process Church, “sought to recruit the Rolling Stones and the Beatles.” During this period, Terry reports that a photo of Rolling Stones leader Mick Jagger’s longtime girlfriend, Marianne Faithfull, appeared in an issue of The Process Magazine. The picture shows her supine, as if dead, clutching a rose. Terry’s book goes on to implicate the Process Church cult in the Charles Manson and Son of Sam multiple murders. It was the former lawyer for the Process Church, John Markham, who recently ran the frameup trial against Lyndon LaRouche.

A key link between the Rolling Stones and the Process Church is Kenneth Anger, a follower of the “founding father” of modern Satanism, Aleister Crowley. Anger, born in 1930, and a child Hollywood movie star, became a devoted disciple of Crowley.

Crowley was born in 1875 and was called the “Great Beast.” He was known to practice ritual child sacrifice regularly, in his role as Satan’s high priest or “Magus.” Crowley died in 1947 due to complications of his huge heroin addiction. Before dying, he succeeded in establishing Satanic covens in many U.S. cities including Hollywood. Anger, like

Crowley, is a Magus, and appears to be the heir to Crowley.

Anger was seventeen years old when Crowley died. In that same year, 1947, Anger was already producing and directing films which, even by today’s standards, reek of pure evil.

During 1966-1967, when the Process Church is reported to be recruiting in London, Anger was also on the scene. Author Tony Sanchez describes that Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger and Keith Richard, and their girlfriends Marianne Faithfull and Anita Pallenburg, “listened spellbound as Anger turned them on to Crowley’s powers and ideas.”(Tony Sanchez, Up and Down WIth the Rolling Stones, p.155)

rt6_jpg-for-web-normalWhile in England, Anger worked on a film dedicated to Aleister Crowley, called Lucifer Rising. The film brought together the Process Church, the Manson Family cult, and the Rolling Stones. The music for the film was composed by Mick Jagger. Process Church follower Marianne Faithfull went all the way to Egypt to participate in the film’s depiction of a Black Mass. The part of Lucifer was played by a guitarist of a California rock group, Bobby Beausoleil. Beausoleil was a member of the Manson Family, and Anger’s homosexual lover.

A few months after filming under Anger’s direction in England, Beausoleil returned to California to commit the first of the Manson family’s series of gruesome murders. Beausoleil was later arrested and is now serving a life sentence in prison along with Manson. Having lost his star performer, Anger then asked Mick Jagger to play Lucifer. He finally settled upon Anton La Vey, author of The Satanic Bible and head of the First Church of Satan, to play the part. The film was released in 1969 with the title Invocation To My Demon Brother.

In London, Anger had succeeded in recruiting to Satanism the girlfriend of one of the Rolling Stones, Anita Pallenberg. Pallenberg had met the Rolling Stones in 1965. She immediately began sexual relations with three out of the five members of the group.

Anger, commenting on Anita, said, “I believe that Anita is, for want of a better word, a witch…The occult unit within the Stones was Keith and Anita…and Brian. You see, Brian was a witch too.”

One of the group’s friends, Tony Sanchez, writes of Pallenberg in his book, Up and Down with the Rolling Stones, “She was obsessed with black magic and began to carry a string of garlic with her everywhere–even to bed–to ward off vampires. She also had a strange mysterious old shaker for holy water which she used for some of her rituals. Her ceremonies became increasingly secret, and she warned me never to interrupt her when she was working on a spell.”(Tony Sanchez, Up and Down WIth the Rolling Stones, p.159)

He continues, “In her bedroom she kept a huge, ornate carved chest, which she guarded so jealously that I assumed it was her drug stash. The house was empty one day, and I decided to take a peep inside. The drawers were filled with scraps of bone, wrinkled skin and fur from some strange animals.”(Tony Sanchez, Up and Down WIth the Rolling Stones, p.159)  

Jagger wearing his satanic Kaballa beads Hollywood is run by  mysticism  who practice blood sacrifice Crowley style they like black and red

Jagger wearing his satanic Kaballa beads Hollywood is run by mysticism
who practice blood sacrifice Crowley style they like black and red

In 1980, the seventeen-year-old caretaker of Keith Richard’s New England estate was found shot to death in Anita Pallenberg’s bed. The death, ruled a suicide, was with Pallenberg’s gun. Richard’s house was located near the East Coast headquarters of the Process Church. According to an article in the English newspaper Midnite, a Connecticut police officer, Michael Passaro, who had responed to the “suicide” reported “strange singing” from the woods a quarter mile from the Richard’s mansion.

The newpaper continues, “There have been several bizarre satanic rituals in the area over the past five years. A local reporter attributed the outbreak of occultism to ‘rich people taking Acid.'”

In 1967, reflecting their ongoing association with Anger and the Process Church, the Rolling Stones released their first rock album openly celebrating the Devil, titled, Their Satanic Majesties Request. A few months earlier, the Beatles had released their first album dedicated to the promotion of psychedelic drugs, Sargeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. The album contained a fantasized version of an LSD trip, called “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds”, or L.S.D. for short. It became a top seller.

Clearly, the Beatles’ album was dedicated to Satanist Aleister Crowley. It was released 20 years, nearly to the day, after Crowley’s death in 1947, and its title song began with the lyrics, “It was twenty years ago today…” The album’s cover featured a picture of Crowley.

One month after the album’s release, the Beatles shocked the world by announcing, publicly, that they were regularly taking LSD. Beatle member Paul McCartney, in an interview with Life magazine said, “LSD opened my eyes. We only use one-tenth of our brain.” They also publicly called for the legalization of marijuana.

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