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Total blackout of Fukushima truth by U.S. media; sailors suffer and die while denial continues

Nearly four years after a major tsunami created the massive tidal wave that destroyed much of Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power complex in the northern part of the country, spewing radioactive waste into the air and surrounding Pacific Ocean, the truth about the after-effects of that disaster continue to reside in the shadows.

For example, one of the most under-reported stories of all pertaining to the disaster — and one that should be of particular interest to Americans — is the fate of a number of crewmembers aboard the USS Ronald Reagan, the U.S. Navy carrier sent to assist Japanese military and civilian authorities in the immediate aftermath of the quake.

According to German magazine Der Spiegel, the Reagan had been dispatched to the Fukushima site the day of the disaster, March 11, 2011, and the massive warship with its 4,500 officers and crew reached the area the next day, anchoring just north of Sendai, where it remained on station for several weeks.