Main Menu

Why You Should Never Eat Food on Planes, and Other Jet-Set Tips

How do cabin crews on long-haul flights avoid jet lag? By not consuming while in the air.

Melissa Biggs Bradley is the founder of luxury travel firm Indagare. The membership-based travel club is the secret weapon of 1 Percenters, known for planning and arranging near-impossible trips from chartering planes and yachts to overnights at billionaires’ private islands.

The cabin crew’s secret to avoiding jet lag.  

I eat nothing on flights. I’ve talked to a lot of stewardesses about it, and it’s a stewardess secret. Ten years ago, it was [a cabin crew member] on Singapore Airlines on what was, at the time, the longest flight in the world (17 hours from Singapore to New York). She told me that her tried-and-true trick was not eating in-flight. Basically, at superhigh altitude, your digestive system shuts down completely. Someone said to me it’s like being under anesthesia. So when you get off the plane, everything restarts and [your digestive system] has so much more work to do and so it makes you more tired.

Most people overeat because it’s a diversion, or a way to pass the time; but even the best plane food is oversalted and preserved so it can be microwaved. So I have something to eat a couple hours before getting on the plane, but otherwise it’s nothing but lots and lots of water. Really and truly, I live by it and I feel so much better. I flew to Paris last week, for example, and I got off the plane at maybe 10 a.m., and when I landed I went for a fabulous lunch, which I didn’t feel guilty about in the slightest.

 

.

Read more

 

 

.






Translate »